Die Papierausgabe 9.4

The June issue of Art South Africa celebrates paper: paper and design, paper making, printing, paper in three dimensions, drawing on paper, artists’ books, and more

The June issue of Art South Africa celebrates paper: paper and design, paper making, printing, paper in three dimensions, drawing on paper, artists’ books, and more. Several interviews with leading South African printmakers consider the growth in interest in prints in the last two decades, both in South Africa and overseas, and a conversation with the director of the legendary Robert Blackburn Print Workshop in New York (where many South Africans have worked over the years) places our own printmaking in an international context. The importance of printmaking in South African art is evidenced by a major current exhibition on South African prints in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, to be reviewed in the magazine alongside a review on MoMA’s show of German Expressionism (which has also had an important influence on a number of local artists). Several essays focus on artists who work in various ways with paper: as sculpture, in book form, in printmaking, in drawing. We are also pleased to present the third in a series of four (highly entertaining) columns by Gavin Younge on sculpture in South Africa and to introduce two new columnists: artist and curator Thembinkosi Goniwe will address the challenges of contemporary curatorial practice, and Michael Blake focuses on the state of new and experimental music in South Africa. Other features in the magazine include essays on the composer Stanley Glasser, on Pietermaritzburg-based printmaker Vulindlela Nyoni, on French composer and visual artist Francois Sarhan (who collaborated with William Kentridge on Telegrams from the Nose), on Nigerian artist Nenna Okore who makes sculptures from paper, an interview with Marlene Dumas, and a discussion of a new public art project in Laingsburg. The June issue also sees the second of our collaborations with South African tertiary institutions through the publication of special supplements in the magazine. The current supplement is from the University of Johannesburg’s Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture. It presents papers from a recent colloquium on the theme of the liminal in South African art and is entitled ‘Space, Ritual, Absence’. Essays range from discussions of the vexed position of the early work of Moshekwa Langa to a recent film project on a Durban taxi driver.